Gin and Tonic Cupcakes

Midwives like gin.
Mostly true.
Midwives like cake
Mostly true.
Re blogged because awesome.

Bake It Instinct

For the last month or so I have pretty much only been making salted caramel brownies because they are everyone’s current favourite and they freeze well and they are easy to convert to gluten free by just switching the flour and they taste so good. Anyway, finally I have made a new and exciting thing: Gin and Tonic cupcakes. Gin and tonic is by far my favourite alcoholic drink and with a friend’s party coming up I thought it was a perfect excuse to try something a bit more grown-up.

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It was based on a recipe I found on Katie Cakes but slightly modified in places:

Ingredients:

For the cakey bit:

  • 175g unsalted butter softened
  • 175g golden caster sugar
  • 175g self raising flour
  • 3 medium eggs
  • 4 tbsp tonic water (I used Fever Tree – yum)
  • 2tbsp gin (I used Hendrick’s)

For the icing

  • 250g unsalted butter softened
  • 500g icing…

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My One Born Every Minute Blogalong. S.8 Ep.3

I’m going to watch this, go for a run, then watch Great British Bake Off – I think GBBO will just make me want to sit at home and eat.

If can can start this by thanking people for their interaction with me over these posts via here and Twitter, including LWHSM account which realised that it was a look at how the information is perceived, not the care that is being given.

That being said, let’s crack on.


“If only you knew what I’d saw today”
Yep, I think that sitting in traffic.

Delia talking about her heritage of strong women and her mum being with her at the birth of her baby “She knew my needs before I even expressed them”
This is where the true “art of midwifery” comes into care; tuning in to a woman and her words and movements and sounds. Really listening to what’s being said and trying to read between the lines as well. Its a fine art and something to strive for.

Sammijo 34 weeks pregnant, drinking Redbull
No. Just no. Pregnant ladies, hear it loud:
No.
We’re not supposed to be negatively judgmental, but this is a clinical thing – caffeine has been shown to be detrimental in pregnancy. Redbull isn’t the best choice.

Being with mum 24/7
Some of us aren’t lucky enough to have a mum to be there during pregnancy or birth, or to look after our children, how good it is that she has that relationship with her. Bit of a double act 🙂

The attitude
This doesn’t just happen to people, people aren’t like that when they are born – her life will have affected her and people around her will have shaped her as well. You can see that from how her mum responds to her in the room “Who are you talking to?!” This is the same for how we treat people; you see lots of posters about abuse of NHS staff not being tolerated, but we need to make sure that no matter how we are spoken to, or the presentation of any attitude – we’re sticking on that smile and understanding that woman and her needs. If that’s to back off, then we back off. There’s a perfectly good staff room to let out  long sigh.

High pulse
Just sayin’ *cough* Redbull *cough*
Excellently tactful way for the midwife to say stop drinking Redbull, and drink water instead

“You can have a walk around, sight seeing and stuff”
That made me laugh 😀

The whimsical music
Can you see the difference? We’ve had clips of Samijo’s verbal spatting with her mum, but now we have a couple of childhood sweethearts…it’s all oboes and woodwind and twinkling pianos and trilling. So that we can see that this is a lovely couple. No doubting that they probably are, but it’s good to be wary of the music that’s playing while you watch.

Talking about the woman while she’s right there.
I’m not going to say about this what you think I am going to say about this – when someone has a complicated history it’s important to get ll the info across to people who are caring for her, what is *better* and what’s being done here is that both midwives are facing Rhiannon. I like this better than the secret huddle – or the proposed handover of information at the foot of someone’s bed on a ward which a friend had suggested was going to happen in their dept (not maternity). All aboard the nope train for that one! It’s one thing involving a person in their own care – it’s quite another involving several relative strangers in the surrounding beds!

Heart strings music
Ah there it is again; Rhiannon’s story needs warrior music if anything, not sympathy music. As IF she wants to have the nation saying “ahhhhh”.

Leanne.
Lovely and friendly but let down by C4 because they have cut out any explanation of why she is doing what she is doing and it’s really obvious because the flow of this scene is jagged and clunky. What it might look like to women? That midwives come in and touch your bump for no reason without washing their hands, and then put you on a monitor.
Might not be the actual case, but all that editing and shunting is what it makes it look like.

Entonox (gas and air)
Not entirely convinced that we’re seeing the picture that Leanne is talking over right now. What help is the gas and air going to be to Sammijo if she breathes in through her nose and out through her mouth? In and out through your mouth if you’re using it, so like I said, not entirely sure that the image on the screen is what we can hear Leanne directing with breathing.

Post natal depression (PND)
It’s heartbreaking to hear Sammijo talk about her PND like that, not only with that clarity, but saying that she just wasn’t there for her daughter for the first three weeks. This is why her previous scenes irk me; OBEM have painted her in a light illustrating her attitude, her attachment to her mum and had that bloody plinky plonky “ooh look at these weirdoes” music playing. This can alienate women into thinking that only certain demographics get PND. Well they don’t – certain things may pre-dispose you to it but being “a bit gobby” is not one of them. Plonking the baby on her as a last resort was a bit risky, and seeking help from midwives and GP and peer support groups is improtant, so we must make sure that women have the best post natal care they can get as well as information to services they can use if they need them.

Leanne is incredible. 
That’s all.

Cystic Fibrosis in pregnancy
Learning new things about this! Eating “constantly” is making me wonder what the “only water now!” protocol is for women with CF?

The CTG

CTG

That’s what the lines mean. The line for contractions only measures the force of the muscular contraction against the toco – it doesn’t tell anyone how much it hurts; the reading is there to observe frequency (if required) but more importantly to see how the fetal heart rate is coping with each contraction.

“You’re not going to be able to do it with just this”
No matter how well you know the person who’s in labour – don’t tell them what they can’t do (Sammijo’s mum)
It’s quite black and white here, Sammijo didn’t feel a connection with her baby after a 27 minute previous precipitate (fast like) labour – she thinks that contributed to her dissociating herself from her baby. While it’s a good idea for women to stay in as much control as they can in labour and to allow their bodies to rest where possible, she clearly feels that the pain helps her to connect with the baby she’s carrying. I totally get that.

“I can’t do this no more”
Sometimes this means that magical stage: transition! *HAAAAAAAALLELUJAH!* In laymans terms, the baby is ready to be pushed out. Sometimes it means that the woman is knackered and in pain and doesn’t know what to do.
Now, does this mean that we are getting a real-ish view of time elapsed and that here mum popping out for a smoke/use the phone means this baby is going to arrive forthwith. Or is this timeline edited for effect? I’ve paused it here, so I genuinely don’t know what happens next at the time of writing.

“Ooh. your baby’s head’s here now”
Ha, there we are then!

PND – just one last note
Because Sammijo’s had it before it makes her predisposed to feel the effects of the post natal depression again, so while you may feel that rush of love (or not) for your next baby, it’s still important to engage with your care providers and your support network of family and friends to make sure that if you’re feeling that way, you have a quick response xx

“Why are you being induced?”
See? See? Seeeeee? The midwifes DO ask, so please SHOW this!

Explaining what they are doing and why.
Not sure why we needed to wait until episode three for this to come to light, but to who ever made the decision to include this info, – about flipping time.

Doctors instead of midwives.
Well actually, let’s be a bit more accurate here – it’s more than likely an anaesthetist – the specialty of whom is to get needles into seemingly impossible spaces. It’ not just a case of an “upgrade” here.

Death
Quite a striking, and frank talk from Rhiannon about death, which is something that I suppose can come from living with a condition like CF where you are given an unbearably short prognosis.

Editing
Honestly, sometimes the editing sequence is more contrived that RuPauls’ Drag race – making people’s facial expressions ft what someone else has said. For instance, Kirsty’s mum has arrived and is sitting in the chemo chair, In is sitting in the smaller one. During the conversation Kirsty is having about a “home” vasectomy” you see Ian’s eyebrows pop up…but that’s a reaction from way earlier in the couple’s stay – you can see Kirsty’s arm on the left of that reaction shot and she’s wearing the top she was when she came in.
No this particular part is not important, but what IS important is knowing that what you see is not necessarily what happens, in order, in reaction. Just be aware.

oneborn1 oneborn2 oneborn3 oneborn4

Not his real reaction to what is said.

“Back to the bed” “Get on the bed”
Gosh…sorry, yes. Um, with noises like that I would have a pair of gloves on to have a look and would have got the mum to ring the bell.
Zero reason here for the woman to be on the bed. I just, can’t – I don’t know why people want women to be on the bed, i don’t get it! If this baby is about to arrive, what good is getting her horizontal going to do? I’ve paused it. I don’t know what is going to happen next, but I can have a good guess. This midwife is going to catch this baby…literally.

Whoosh
Ok well, the dad caught it, an that midwife is THE FONZ, wow she’s cool and calm!

*Edit – Having seen a Tweet saying ” Less than a minute earlier it would’ve been in the toilet!” let’s not be hasty shall we? Les than a minute on OBEM could be five minutes or 8 hours – as per the editing sequence above.

Sorry
Unless you hurt someone or are nasty in labour, you rarely need to apologise. Human nature, I know, but no one expects and apology because you’ve had a baby 🙂

Shellshock
Ian. Look at that poor bloke.

“Delivered by dad”
Pretty sure Ian’s cervix didn’t dilate at any time, but it was a good catch.

The Epidural
Ok ok ok. So the partners are allowed to stay in the room for the epidural, but it’s a theatre thing then this complete exclusion of the partner when siting it in theatre? I feel we’re getting somewhere with finding out the answer to this mystery.

It’s making me worry
Yeah your blood pressure does drop after an epidural, yes her blood pressure was low, yes she’s now feeling feint.
Ok. Right I’m unpausing it again.

Its this music. and that’s why you have to be wary of it. The power of music influences your feelings over what you are watching, and you can’t help it.

How do we go about getting an OBE or something for Delia? Anyone know?

obe

The main thing that sticks out in my head is that somewhere a woman has watched that and will rigidly stick to the bed during her labour and birth for fear that her baby might just fall out if she goes for a wee. And if that’s even the reaction of one person, then I’ll need to write a letter of thanks to Channel 4 for setting the active birth movement back about 70 years.

Twidmife x